Planning Guide


Funerals: A Consumer Guide 

When a loved one dies, grieving family members and friends often are confronted with dozens of decisions about the funeral - all of which must be made quickly and often under great emotional duress. What kind of funeral should it be? What funeral provider should you use? Should you bury or cremate the body, or donate it to science? What are you legally required to buy? What other arrangements should you plan? And, as callous as it may sound, how much is it all going to cost? Each year, Americans grapple with these and many other questions as they spend billions of dollars arranging more than 2 million funerals for family members and friends. The increasing trend toward pre-need planning - when people make funeral arrangements in advance - suggests that many consumers want to compare prices and services so that ultimately, the funeral reflects a wise and well-informed purchasing decision, as well as a meaningful one.

Planning

Thinking ahead can help you make informed and thoughtful decisions about funeral arrangements. It allows you to choose the specific items you want and need and compare the prices offered by several funeral providers. It also spares your survivors the stress of making these decisions under the pressure of time and strong emotions. One other important consideration when planning a funeral pre-need is where the remains will be buried, entombed or scattered. In the short time between the death and burial of a loved one, many family members find themselves rushing to buy a cemetery plot or grave - often without careful thought or a personal visit to the site. That's why it's in the family's best interest to buy cemetery plots before you need them. You may wish to make decisions about your arrangements in advance, but not pay for them in advance. Keep in mind that over time, prices may go up and businesses may close or change ownership. However, in some areas with increased competition, prices may go down over time. It's a good idea to review and revise your decisions every few years, and to make sure your family is aware of your wishes.

Put your preferences in writing, give copies to family members and your attorney, and keep a copy in a handy place. Don't designate your preferences in your will, because a will often is not found or read until after the funeral. And avoid putting the only copy of your preferences in a safe deposit box. That's because your family may have to make arrangements on a weekend or holiday, before the box can be opened.

 What Kind of Funeral Do You Want?

Every family is different, and not everyone wants the same type of funeral. Funeral practices are influenced by religious and cultural traditions, costs and personal preferences. These factors help determine whether the funeral will be elaborate or simple, public or private, religious or secular, and where it will be held. They also influence whether the body will be present at the funeral, if there will be a viewing or visitation, and if so, whether the casket will be open or closed, and whether the remains will be buried or cremated. Among the choices you'll need to make are whether you want one of these basic types of funerals, or something in between.

 

"Traditional," full-service funeral 

This type of funeral, often referred to by funeral providers as a "traditional" funeral, usually includes a viewing or visitation and formal funeral service, use of a hearse to transport the body to the funeral site and cemetery, and burial, entombment or cremation of the remains.It is generally the most expensive type of funeral. In addition to the funeral home's basic services fee, costs often include embalming and dressing the body; rental of the funeral home for the viewing or service; and use of vehicles to transport the family if they don't use their own. The costs of a casket, cemetery plot or crypt and other funeral goods and services also must be factored in.

 

Direct burial 

The body is buried shortly after death, usually in a simple container. No viewing or visitation is involved, so no embalming is necessary. A memorial service may be held at the graveside or later. Direct burial usually costs less than the "traditional," full-service funeral. Costs include the funeral home's basic services fee, as well as transportation and care of the body, the purchase of a casket or burial container and a cemetery plot or crypt. If the family chooses to be at the cemetery for the burial, the funeral home often charges an additional fee for a graveside service.

 

Direct cremation 

The body is cremated shortly after death, without embalming. The cremated remains are placed in an urn or other container. No viewing or visitation is involved, although a memorial service may be held, with or without the cremated remains present. The remains can be kept in the home, buried or placed in a crypt or niche in a cemetery, or buried or scattered in a favorite spot. Direct cremation usually costs less than the "traditional," full-service funeral. Costs include the funeral home's basic services fee, as well as transportation and care of the body. A crematory fee may be included or, if the funeral home does not own the crematory, the fee may be added on. There also will be a charge for an urn or other container. The cost of a cemetery plot or crypt is included only if the remains are buried or entombed. Funeral providers who offer direct cremations also must offer to provide an alternative container that can be used in place of a casket.  For More Information please visit 
 
Packages
Types of services Offered 
Package A. 
 (Cremation with no Service)
* Direct Cremation
* Alternative Container
* Professional Services 
* County Coroner's Fee if required
* 5 Certified Death Certificates 
 
  
Package B 
(Cremation with Memorial Service)

* Direct Cremation
* Alternative Container
* Professional Services & Facilities
* One hour visitation or calling period
* Guest Book
* Prayer Cards
* Acknowledgment Cards
* 5 Certified Death Certificates
 
 
  Package C
(Viewing followed by Cremation) 
* Rental Casket
* Embalming
* Professional Services & Facilities
* One hour Viewing 
* Guest Book
* Prayer Cards
* Acknowledgment Cards
* Crematory Charges
* County Coroner's Fee
* 5 Certified Death Certificates 
 
  
Package D
(Immediate Burial)
* Professional Services & Facilities
* 20 Gauge Casket available in Blue, Bronze, Silver, or White
* Grave Liner
* 5 Certified Death Certificates
* Hearse to the Cemetery 
   
Package E
(Full Traditional Service) 
* Professional Services & Facilities
* Embalming
* One Hour Viewing
* Hearse to the Cemetery
* 20 Gauge Casket  available in Blue, Bronze, Silver, or White
* Grave Liner
* 5 Certified Death Certificates
* Guest Book
* Prayer Cards
* Acknowledgment Cards
 
These package prices do not include any cash advances. A cash advance would be a clergy honorarium, newspaper notices, cemetery fees, flowers, or church fees.   
Prices subject to change without notice.        
   
 
 Cash Advance Price Averages 
Church $150.00
Clergy $150.00
Philadelphia Inquirer $750.00
Intelligencer / Record Newspaper $250
Flowers $100 depending on type selected
Death Certificate $6.00 each 
Coroners Fee for Cremation $60.00 (depending on county)
Crematory Fees $350
Bagpiper $200
Singer $100
Organist $100
New Cemetery Graves $1400.00 and up
Cemetery Opening Charge $1800.00 and up  

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Planning Guide

Caskets

Vaults

Prayer Cards and Prayers

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